Volume 6, Issue 3, September 2020, Page: 30-38
Patient’s Adherence Towards Antihypertensive Medication and Life-Style Modification in Asmara, Eritrea
Daniel Tikue Asrat, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Brkti Abraham, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Daniel Abraham, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Filmawit Negassi, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Habtom Mezgebo, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Solomon Mengisteab, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Ghirmay Ghebreizgiabher, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Frezghi Hidray, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Received: Aug. 29, 2020;       Accepted: Sep. 17, 2020;       Published: Dec. 16, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.jddmc.20200603.12      View  56      Downloads  16
Abstract
Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, and end-stage renal disease and remains the main public health challenge. In Africa, 15% of the population has hypertension [1]. According to the data from Health Information Management System (HIMS) of Eritrea the incidence of hypertension in Eritrea was 8305 in 2014. Poor adherence towards antihypertensive medication is the main problem of treatment failure and wastage of health care resource which leads to increased morbidity and mortality rate among hypertensive patients [2]. The aim of the study is to assess patient’s adherence level towards antihypertensive medication and their life style modification in Halibet and Hazhaz Hospitals. This is Hospital based cross-sectional quantitative study. Sample size was determined using Krejcie & Morgan formula. The sample size was 360. Sample of 360 was collected by consecutive non probability method by approaching the patients during their follow up time those who fulfill the inclusion criteria. Pilot study was done in Halibet hospital. Morisky medication adherence scale was used to assess medication adherence rate. Data was entered and analyzed using statistics package for social sciences version 20. P-value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The ethical issue was dealt by obtaining a permission letter from the School of Nursing and given to the medical directors of both hospitals. The adherence rate of the respondents towards medication was 69.2%. Among the respondents 71.7% had good adherence towards life style modification. Most of the participants were found to be adherent to their medication and life style modification that is 69.2% &71.7% respectively. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was negatively associate with medication adherence at p- value=0.004 and 0.002 respectively. Age was significantly associated (p-value=0.000) with adherence to lifestyle modification. Recommendation health education should be given routinely to improve the rate of adherence toward their medication and life style modification by improving patient’s knowledge and perception about hypertension and its consequence.
Keywords
Patient Adherence, Lifestyle Modification, Hypertension
To cite this article
Daniel Tikue Asrat, Brkti Abraham, Daniel Abraham, Filmawit Negassi, Habtom Mezgebo, Solomon Mengisteab, Ghirmay Ghebreizgiabher, Frezghi Hidray, Patient’s Adherence Towards Antihypertensive Medication and Life-Style Modification in Asmara, Eritrea, Journal of Drug Design and Medicinal Chemistry. Vol. 6, No. 3, 2020, pp. 30-38. doi: 10.11648/j.jddmc.20200603.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Alemie, A. G., Ambaw, D. A., Mengesha, B. Z, B. Z., &W/Johannes, M. S. (2012). Adherence to antihypertensive treatment and associated factors among patients on follow up at University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. BMC Public Health, 12: 282 doi: 10.1186/1471-2458.
[2]
Ministry of Health (2014). Cardiovascular Control Program: Annual report. Asmara, Eritrea.
[3]
Jimmy, B. and Jose, J. (2011). Patient Medication Adherence: Measures in Daily Practice. Oman Journal of hypertension, 26 (3): 225-229.
[4]
Sabaté E. Adherence to long-term therapies: evidence for action. World Health Organization; [Accessed Jul 2012]. [Updated 2003; cited May 2012]. Available from: http://apps.who.int/medicinedocs/en/d/Js4883e/6.1.3.html. [Google Scholar].
[5]
Ahari, S. S., Biria, M., Heydari, H., Kamran, A., Malepour, A. (2014). Determinants of Patient's Adherence to Hypertension Medications: Application of Health Belief Model among Rural Patients. Ann Med Health Sic Res, 4 (6): 922–927. doi: 10.4103/2141-9248.144914.
[6]
Gabriel Uche Pascal Iloh, Agwu Nkwa Amadi, Godwin Oguejiofor Chukwuebuka Okafor, Augustine Obiora Ikwudinma, Frances Udoka Odu and Ezinne Uchamma Godswill-Uko. (2014) Adherence to Lifestyle Modifications among Adult Hypertensive Nigerians with Essential Hypertension in a Primary Care Clinic of a Tertiary Hospital in Resource-poor Environment of Eastern Nigeria. British Journal of Medicine & Medical Research 4 (18): 3478-3490.
[7]
Dewhurst, M. J. and Walker, R. W. (2015). Hypertension in sub-Saharan Africa; prevalence, prescription, pitfalls and paradigms. Journal of Human Hypertension, 10.1038/jhh.2015.93.
[8]
Gebremichael, A, A., Konia, A., Mebrahtu, G., Mound, J., Masjuan, M., Ghebrat, Y, Y. &Nyarango Usman, (2006). The prevalence of hypertension and its relationship with obesity: results from national blood pressure survey in Eritrea. Journal of Human Hypertension, 20 (1), 59–65.
[9]
Ahmad, N. S., Ramli, A., & Paraidathathu, T. (2012). Medication adherence among hypertensive patients of primary health clinics in Malaysia. Patient preference and adherence, 6 (1): 613-622.
[10]
Abbas, K., Afraid, MB. Hashmi, Sk., et al. (2007). Factors associated with adherence to antihypertensive treatment in Pakistan. PLoS ONE 2 (3): e280.
[11]
Ahmed, M., Anuw, R., Froa, M., Gunasekaran, T., Kefale, B., & Tadesse, E. (2015). An Assessment of Adherence of Patients to Anti-Hypertensive Medication and Factors for Non-Adherence in Oromia Region Adama Referral Hospital, Ethiopia. Global Journal of Medical Research, 1 (1); vergion 1.0.
[12]
Muhammad Umair Khan, Shahjahan Shah, and Tahir Hameed: 2014, Barriers to and determinants of medication adherence among hypertensive patients attended National Health Service Hospital, Sunderland: J Pharm Bioallied Sci. 2014 Apr-Jun; 6 (2): 104–108. doi: 10.4103/0975-7406.129175.
[13]
Abel Tibebu, Daniel Mengistu, and Lemma Negesa: 2017, Adherence to recommended lifestyle modifications and factors associated for hypertensive patients attending chronic follow-up units of selected public hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: 2017 Feb 24. doi: 10.2147/PPA.S126382, PMCID: PMC5338986, PMID: 28280305.
[14]
Elbur AI. Level of adherence to lifestyle changes and medications among male hypertensive patients in two hospitals in taif; Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Int J Pharm Pharm Sci. 2015; 7 (4): 168–172. [Google Scholar].
[15]
Danaei G, Finucane MM, Lin JK, et al. National, regional, and global trends in systolic blood pressure since 1980: systematic analysis of health examination surveys and epidemiological studies. Lancet. 2011; 377 (9765): 568–577. [PubMed] [Google Scholar].
[16]
Akhter N. Self-Management among Patients with Hypertension in Bangladesh. Prince of Songkla University; Bangladesh: 2010. [Google Scholar].
[17]
Hu H, Li G, Arao T. Prevalence rates of self-care behaviors and related factors in a rural hypertension population: a questionnaire survey. Int J Hypertens. 2013; 526949. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar].
[18]
Azadbakht L, Fard NRP, Karimi M, et al. Effects of the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) eating plan on cardiovascular risks among type 2 diabetic patients: a randomized crossover clinical trial. Diabetes Care. 2011; 34 (1): 55–57. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar].
Browse journals by subject